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ǹyg:ܾ֣˱սûгһƲ

2020-08-07 10:34:10  Դձ
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ǹygַ:a g 9 559 v i p

Being come to the house of Arriguccio, entring in, and ascendingup the stayres: they heard Simonida sweetly singing at her working;but pausing, upon hearing their rude trampling, shee demaunded, whowas there. One of the angry brethren presently answered: Lewde womanas thou art, thou shalt know soone enough who is heere: Our blessedLady be with us (quoth Simonida) and sweet Saint Frances helpe todefend me, who dare use such unseemely speeches? Starting up andmeeting them on the staire head: Kinde brethren, (said she) is it you?What, and my loving mother too? For sweet Saint Charities sake, whatmay be the reason of your comming hither in this manner. Shee beingset downe againe to her worke, so neatly apparelled, without any signeof outrage offered her, her face unblemished, her haire comelyordered, and differing wholly from the former speeches of her Husband:the Brethren marvelled thereat not a little; and asswaging somewhatthe impetuous torrent of their rage, began to demaund in cooleblood, (as it were) from what ground her Husbands complaintsproceeded, and threatning her roughly, if she would not confesse thetruth intirely to them.

ǹyg廭

Madam Philippa, being accused by her Husband Rinaldo de Pugliese,because he tooke her in Adulterie, with a yong Gentleman namedLazarino de Guazzagliotri: caused her to bee cited before the Judge.From whom she delivered her selfe, by a sodaine, witty, and pleasantanswer, and moderated a severe strict Statute, formerly made againstwomen.

In his riding towards France, as he passed by Naples, heeovertooke another yong Gentleman, a native of Antioch, and namedGiosefo, whose journey lay the same way as the others did. Havingridden in company some few dayes together, as it is a custome commonlyobserved among Travellers, to understand one anothers Countrey andcondition, as also to what part his occasions call him: so happened itwith them, Giosefo directly telling him, that he journyed, towards thewise King Salomon, to desire his advise what meanes he shouldobserve in the reclaiming of a wilfull wife, the most froward andselfe-willed woman that ever lived; whom neither faire perswasions,nor gentle courtesies could in any manner prevaile withall.Afterward he demaunded of Melisso, to know the occasion of histravell, and whither.

After some indifferent respite of time, it chanced that the youngDamosel (who was named Iphigenia) awaked before any of the otherwith her, and lifted up her head, with her eyes wide open, she sawChynon standing before her, leaning still on his staffe; whereatmarvailing not a little, she saide unto him: Chynon, whither wanderestthou, or what dost thou seeke for in this wood? Chynon, who notonely by his countenance but likewise his folly, Nobility of birth,and wealthy possessions of his father, was generally knowne throughoutthe Countrey, made no answere at all to the demand of Iphigenia: butso soone as he beheld her eyes open, he began to observe them with aconstant regard, and being perswaded in his soule, that from themflowed such an unutterable singularity, as he had never felt tillthen. Which the young Gentlewoman well noting, she began to waxfearefull, least these stedfast lookes of his, should incite hisrusticity to some attempt, which might redound to her dishonour:wherefore awaking her women and servants, and they all being risen,she saide. Farewell Chynon, I leave thee to thine owne good Fortune;whereto hee presently replyed, saying: I will go with you. Now,although the Gentlewoman refused his company, as dreading some acte ofincivility from him: yet could she not devise any way to be rid ofhim, till he had brought her to her owne dwelling, where takingleave mannerly of her, he went directly home to his Fathers house,saying: Nothing should compell him to live any longer in the muddyCountry. And albeit his Father was much offended hereat, and all therest of his kindred and friends: (yet not knowing how to helpe it)they suffered him to continue there still, expecting the cause of thishis so sodaine alteration, from the course of life, which contentedhim so highly before.

ǹyg ɻ

WITHALL, THAT NEITHER FEARE, DANGERS, NOR DEATH IT SELFE,

Much did shee pitty her Husbands perplexity, devising by what goodand warrantable meanes she might make knowne her innocency to him;wherein her place and authority did greatly sted her, and shewrought with divers gallant Merchants of Geneway that then remained inAlexandria, and by vertue of the Soldans friendly letters beside, tobring him thither upon an lall occasion. Come he did, albeit inespeciall in poore and meane order, which soone was better alteredby her appointment, and he verie honourably (though in private)entertained by divers of her woorthie friends, till time did favourwhat she further intended.

ǹygйҶ ۻ

Moreover, she was so grievously payned with the head-ake, as itseemed to split in a thousand pieces, whereat there needed no greatthe Lead of the Turret being so exceedingly hot, that it affoorded notthe least defence against it, or any repose to qualifie the torment:but drove her still from one place to another, in hope of ease, butnone was there to be found.

And therefore thou must packe away,

Be now (at length) a little moov'd to pittie,

ǹygͻ

"Now, for proofe of that which I have said, to be most true andinfallible, and that his deede deserveth to bee much more commendedthen yours, let it bee duely considered on, point by point. That Iam a young man and a Philosophe, as Gisippus is; my yeares, face,and studies, without seeking after further proofe, doth sufficientlytestifie: One selfe-same age is both his and mine, in like qualityof course have wee lived and studied together. True it is, that hee isan Athenian, and I am a Romaine. But if the glory of these twoCities should bee disputed on: then let mee tell you, that I am of aCitie that is Francke and Free, and hee is of a Tributarie Citie. Isay that I am of a Citie, which is chiefe Lady and Mistresse of thewhole World and hee is of a Citie subject to mine. I say that I amof a Citie, that is strong in Arms, Empire, and studies: whereas hiscan commend it selfe but for Studies onely. And although you seemeheere to bee a Scholler, in appearance meane enough, yet I am notdescended of the simplest stocke in Rome.

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ǹygƼĶ

ǹygﻪϺмָɲҩ֣ٷͨ At the same time, there lived in Pistoya likewise, a young man,named Ricciardo, derived of meane birth, but very wealthy, quickewitted, and of commendable person, alwayes going so neate, fine, andformall in his apparrell, that he was generally tearmed the Magnifico,who had long time affected, yea, and closely courted, (though anyadvantage or successe) the Lady and wife of Signior Francesco, who wasvery beautifull, vertuous, and chaste. It so chanced, that thisMagnifico had the very choisest and goodliest ambling Gelding in allTuscany, which hee loved dearely, for his faire forme, and othergood parts. Upon a flying rumor throughout Pistoia, that he daily madelove to the foresaid Ladie, some busie-body put it into the head ofSignior Francesco, that if he pleased to request the Gelding, theMagnifico would frankely give it him, in regard of the love he bare tohis wife. ϸ

3人йţžӹ人Щҥ| ̵2018|ʸòóɻǸˣ...

ǹygΪ֪241˰ǰμһս¾ Bergamino, by telling a tale of a skilfull man, named Primasso,and of an Abbot of Clugni; honestly checked a new kinde ofCovetousnesse, in Mayster Can de la Scala. ϸ

ǹyg֪칫ұ˽һ| ̵2018|WHOйܶ
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