վҳʱ ƾ̨ ۵ Ļ Ƶ֪ʶȨ

ֿdjƽ̨½վ:еһ˿ ¼еĶ˲

2020-08-10 15:13:01  Դձ
ֿdjƽ̨½վС 

ֿdjƽ̨½վ

ֿdjƽ̨½վַ:a g 9 559 v i p<"There it was that I heard news of Ulysses, for the king told mehe had entertained him, and shown him much hospitality while he was onhis homeward journey. He showed me also the treasure of gold, andwrought iron that Ulysses had got together. There was enough to keephis family for ten generations, so much had he left in the house ofking Pheidon. But the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the god's high oak tree, and know whetherafter so long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly, or insecret. Moreover the king swore in my presence, making drink-offeringsin his own house as he did so, that the ship was by the water side,and the crew found, that should take him to his own country. He sentme off however before Ulysses returned, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,and he told those in charge of her to be sure and take me safely toKing Acastus."Then, when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Isent some men to Circe's house to fetch the body of Elpenor. We cutfirewood from a wood where the headland jutted out into the sea, andafter we had wept over him and lamented him we performed his funeralrites. When his body and armour had been burned to ashes, we raiseda cairn, set a stone over it, and at the top of the cairn we fixed theoar that he had been used to row with.

"'Ulysses,' he answered, 'noble son of Laertes, was not lost atsea in any storm of Neptune's raising, nor did my foes despatch meupon the mainland, but Aegisthus and my wicked wife were the deathof me between them. He asked me to his house, feasted me, and thenbutchered me most miserably as though I were a fat beast in aslaughter house, while all around me my comrades were slain like sheepor pigs for the wedding breakfast, or picnic, or gorgeous banquet ofsome great nobleman. You must have seen numbers of men killed eitherin a general engagement, or in single combat, but you never sawanything so truly pitiable as the way in which we fell in thatcloister, with the mixing-bowl and the loaded tables lying allabout, and the ground reeking with our-blood. I heard Priam's daughterCassandra scream as Clytemnestra killed her close beside me. I laydying upon the earth with the sword in my body, and raised my hands tokill the slut of a murderess, but she slipped away from me; shewould not even close my lips nor my eyes when I was dying, for thereis nothing in this world so cruel and so shameless as a woman when shehas fallen into such guilt as hers was. Fancy murdering her ownhusband! I thought I was going to be welcomed home by my childrenand my servants, but her abominable crime has brought disgrace onherself and all women who shall come after- even on the good ones.'

ֿdjƽ̨½վ廭

Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."

"Mother- but you are so hard that I cannot call you by such aname- why do you keep away from my father in this way? Why do younot sit by his side and begin talking to him and asking him questions?No other woman could bear to keep away from her husband when he hadcome back to her after twenty years of absence, and after havinggone through so much; but your heart always was as hard as a stone."

"Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.

ֿdjƽ̨½վ ɻ

But Ulysses did not know what to think. "Alas," he said to himselfin his dismay, "this is only some one or other of the gods who isluring me to ruin by advising me to will quit my raft. At any rate Iwill not do so at present, for the land where she said I should bequit of all troubles seemed to be still a good way off. I know whatI will do- I am sure it will be best- no matter what happens I willstick to the raft as long as her timbers hold together, but when thesea breaks her up I will swim for it; I do not see how I can do anybetter than this."

Thus did they converse; but the others, when they had finished theirwork and the feast was ready, left off working, and took each hisproper place on the benches and seats. Then they began eating; byand by old Dolius and his sons left their work and came up, fortheir mother, the Sicel woman who looked after Laertes now that he wasgrowing old, had been to fetch them. When they saw Ulysses and werecertain it was he, they stood there lost in astonishment; butUlysses scolded them good-naturedly and said, "Sit down to yourdinner, old man, and never mind about your surprise; we have beenwanting to begin for some time and have been waiting for you."

ֿdjƽ̨½վйҶ ۻ

Menelaus smiled and took Telemachus's hand within his own. "What yousay," said he, "shows that you come of good family. I both can, andwill, make this exchange for you, by giving you the finest and mostprecious piece of plate in all my house. It is a mixing-bowl byVulcan's own hand, of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaidwith gold. Phaedimus, king of the Sidonians, gave it me in thecourse of a visit which I paid him when I returned thither on myhomeward journey. I will make you a present of it."

AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.

The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."

ֿdjƽ̨½վͻ

<"Do not find fault child," said Euryclea, "when there is no one tofind fault with. The stranger sat and drank his wine as long as heliked: your mother did ask him if he would take any more bread andhe said he would not. When he wanted to go to bed she told theservants to make one for him, but he said he was re such wretchedoutcast that he would not sleep on a bed and under blankets; heinsisted on having an undressed bullock's hide and some sheepskins putfor him in the cloister and I threw a cloak over him myself."To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."

And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

ƷͼƬֿdjƽ̨½վ

(ࣺӱӱ)

ֿdjƽ̨½վר

ֿdjƽ̨½վƼĶ

ֿdjƽ̨½վȫߴSUVͨD90Ͱ "I also saw Maera and Clymene and hateful Eriphyle, who sold her ownhusband for gold. But it would take me all night if I were to nameevery single one of the wives and daughters of heroes whom I saw,and it is time for me to go to bed, either on board ship with my crew,or here. As for my escort, heaven and yourselves will see to it." ϸ

ַ޴90ƽʺ ̴ײɫ̫| ̵2018|쾼:̤ʵй̳̫

ֿdjƽ̨½վ˳29.99Ԫ-37.99ԪSUV Then Penelope answered, "Stranger, heaven robbed me of all beauty,whether of face or figure, when the Argives set sail for Troy and mydear husband with them. If he were to return and look after my affairsI should be both more respected and should show a better presence tothe world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. The chiefs fromall our islands- Dulichium, Same, and Zacynthus, as also from Ithacaitself, are wooing me against my will and are wasting my estate. I cantherefore show no attention to strangers, nor suppliants, nor topeople who say that they are skilled artisans, but am all the timebrokenhearted about Ulysses. They want me to marry again at once,and I have to invent stratagems in order to deceive them. In the firstplace heaven put it in my mind to set up a great tambour-frame in myroom, and to begin working upon an enormous piece of fineneedlework. Then I said to them, 'Sweethearts, Ulysses is indeed dead,still, do not press me to marry again immediately; wait- for I wouldnot have my skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havefinished making a pall for the hero Laertes, to be ready against thetime when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the women ofthe place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.' This was what Isaid, and they assented; whereon I used to keep working at my greatweb all day long, but at night I would unpick the stitches again bytorch light. I fooled them in this way for three years without theirfinding it out, but as time wore on and I was now in my fourth year,in the waning of moons, and many days had been accomplished, thosegood-for-nothing hussies my maids betrayed me to the suitors, whobroke in upon me and caught me; they were very angry with me, so I wasforced to finish my work whether I would or no. And now I do not seehow I can find any further shift for getting out of this marriage.My parents are putting great pressure upon me, and my son chafes atthe ravages the suitors are making upon his estate, for he is nowold enough to understand all about it and is perfectly able to lookafter his own affairs, for heaven has blessed him with an excellentdisposition. Still, notwithstanding all this, tell me who you areand where you come from- for you must have had father and mother ofsome sort; you cannot be the son of an oak or of a rock." ϸ

ֿdjƽ̨½վ˾ͽĸж| ̵2018|ŷ-ж4-4˰ֿ˹ ˫
ֿdjƽ̨½վעֿdjƽ̨½վ΢

΢

΢

ֻ

쵼԰