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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘客 大小:qDedtvG347962KB 下载:sKsxFTjL99488次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:FeUo6UqX64617条
日期:2020-08-12 05:59:24
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唐朝杨

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  (IN THE ENDE) ARE JUSTLY PUNNISHED FOR THEIR TREACHERY
2.  In a short while after, Master Doctor Mazzeo was returned fromMalfy, to proceede in his cure of the poore mans legge; and callingfor his glasse of Water, which he left standing in his owne Chamberwindow, it was found quite empty, and not a drop in it: whereat heraged so extreamly, as never had the like impatience bene noted inhim. His wife, and her Maide, who had another kinde of businesse intheir braine, about a dead man so strangely come to life againe,knew not well what to say; but at the last, his Wife thus replyedsomewhat angerly. Sir (quoth she) what a coyle is here about apaltry glasse of Water, which perhaps hath bene spilt, yet neytherof us faulty therein? Is there no more such water to be had in theworld? Alas deere Wife (saide he) you might repute it to be a commonkinde of Water, but indeed it was not so; for I did purposely compoundit, onely to procure a dead seeming sleepe: And so related the wholematter at large, of the Pacients legge, and his Waters losse.
3.  This sight was not a little greevous to the Prince Gerbino, whomadded now with this their monstrous cruelty, and not caring whatbecame of his owne life, having lost her for whom he onely desiredto live: not dreading their Darts, Arrowes, slinged stones, or whatviolence els they could use against him; he leapt aboord their ship,in despight of all that durst resist him, behaving himselfe there likea hunger-starved Lyon, when he enters among a heard of beasts, tearingtheir carkasses in pieces both with his teeth and pawes. Such wasthe extreme fury of this poore Prince, not sparing the life of anyone, that durst appeare in his presence; so that what with thebloody slaughter, and violence of the fires encreasing in the Ship;the Mariners got such wealth as possibly they could save, andsuffering the Sea to swallow the rest, Gerbino returned unto hisGallies againe, nothing proud of this so ill-gotten victory.
4.  Thorello (whom the Soldane called by no other name, then theChristian, neyther of them knowing the other) sadly now remembredhis departure from Pavia, devising and practising many times, how hemight escape thence, but could not compasse it by any possible meanes.Wherefore, certaine Ambassadours beeing sent by the Genewayes, toredeeme divers Cittizens of theirs, there detained as prisoners, andbeing ready to returne home againe: he purposed to write to hisWife, that he was living, and wold repaire to her so soone as hecould, desiring the still continued rememberance of her limitedtime. By close and cunning meanes hee wrote the Letter, earnestlyintreating one of the Ambassadors (who knew him perfectly, but made nooutward apparance thereof) to deale in such sort for him, that theLetter might be delivered to the handes of the Abbot Di San Pietroin Ciel d'Oro, who was (indeede) his Unckle.
5.  THE EIGHT DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL
6.  It is no long time since, that there lived in Genes or Geneway, aGentleman named Signior Herminio de Grimaldo, who (as every one welknew) was more rich in inheritances, and ready summes of currant moneythen any other knowne Citizen in Italy. And as hee surpassed other menin wealth, so did he likewise excell them in wretched Avarice, beingso miserably greedy and covetous, as no man in the world could be morewicked that way; because, not onely he kept his purse lockt up frompleasuring any, but denied needfull things to himselfe, enduringmany miseries onely to avoid expences, contrary to the Genewayesgenerall custom, who alwayes delighted to be decently cloathed, and tohave their dyet of the best. By reason of which most miserablebasenesse, they tooke away from him the Sirname of Grimaldi, whereofhe was in right descended, and called him master Herminio the covetousMizer, a nickname very notably agreeing with his gripple nature.

计划指导

1.  As a loyall Maide,
2.  A lustie youthfull Priest of Varlungo, fell in love with a prettywoman, named Monna Belcolore. To compasse his amorous desire, heelefte his Cloake (as a pledge of further payment) with her. By asubtile sleight afterward, he made meanes to borrow a Morter of her,which when hee sent home againe in the presence of her Husband; hedemaunded to have his Cloake sent him, as having left it in pawnefor the Morter. To pacifie her Husband, offended that shee did notlend the Priest the Morter without a pawne: she sent him backe hisCloake againe, albeit greatly against her will.
3.  On the morrow morning, Ricciardo went to an auncient woman of hisacquaintance, who was the Mistresse of a Bathing-house, and therewhere he had appointed Madame Catulla, that the Bath should beeprepared for her, giving her to understand the whole businesse, anddesiring her to be favourable therein to him. The woman, who had beenemuch beholding to him in other matters, promised very willingly tofulfill his request, concluding with him, both what should be done andsaid. She had in her house a very darke Chamber, without any window toaffoord it the least light, which Chamber she had made ready,according to Ricciardoes direction, with a rich Bed thereir, so softand delicate as possible could bee, wherein he entred so soone as hehad dined, to attend the arrivall of Madame Catulla. On the sameday, as she had heard the speeches of Ricciardo, and gave morecredit to them then became her; shee returned home to her house inwonderfull impatience. And Philippello her husband came homediscontentedly too, whose head being busied about some worldlyaffaires, perhaps he looked not so pleasantly, neither used her sokindly, as he was wont to doe. Which Catulla perceiving, shee wasten times more suspicious then before, saying to her selfe. Nowapparent trueth doth disclose it selfe, my husbands head is troublednow with nothing else, but Ricciardoes wife, with whom (to morrow)he purposeth his meeting; wherein he shall be disappointed, if I live;taking no rest at all the whole night, for thinking how to handleher husband.
4.  She was a Lady of extraordinary beauty, tall stature, verysumptuously attired, and having two sweet Sonnes (resembling Angels)she came with them waiting before her, and graciously saluted herguests.
5.  Thoughts, have you lost your quiet silent sleeping.
6.  The Novell recited by Pamphilus, was highly pleasing to the company,and much commended by the Ladies: and after it had beene diligentlyobserved among them, the Queene commanded Madam Neiphila (who wasseated neerest to Pamphilus) that, in relating another of hers, sheshould follow on in the pastime thus begun. She being no lessegracious in countenance, then merrily disposed; made answere, thatshee would obey her charge, and began in this manner.

推荐功能

1.  Never speake so faire and flattering to us, for we are movedbeyond all compasse of patience. All misfortunes in the worlde fallupon you, and an evill death may you dye, like the most false andperfidious Traitor living on the earth. We must beate our braines, andmove all our most endeared friends, onely for your honor andadvancement: while wee were well neere starved to death in the coldlike Dogs, and, by your breach of promise, have bin this night soextreamly beaten, as if (like Asses) we should have beene driven toRome.
2.  Moreover, although thou condemnest my beauty greatly, esteeming itas a trifle, momentary, and of slender continuance; yet, such as it is(being comparable with any other womans whatsoever) I am not soignorant, that were there no other reason to induce liking thereof:yet men in the vigour of their youth (as I am sure you think yourselfe not aged) do hold it for an especiall delight, ordained bynature for them to admire and honour. And notwithstanding all thycruelty extended to mee, yet I cannot be perswaded, that thou art soflinty or Ironhearted, as to desire my miserable death, by castingmy selfe headlong downe (like a desperate madde woman) before thyface, so to destroy that beuty, which (if thy Letters lyed not) wasonce so highly pleasing in thine eyes. Take pitty then on mee forcharities sake, because the Sunne beginneth to heate extreamely: andas over-much colde (that unhappy night) was mine offence, so let notover-violent warmth be now my utter ruine and death.
3.  Why should blacke cloudes obscure so bright a cleare?
4.  I hate all such as do complaine,
5.   THE FIRST DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
6.  A young Gentleman being a Scholler, fell in love with a Ladie, namedHelena, she being a Widdow, and addicted in affection to anotherGentleman. One whole night in cold Winter, she caused the Schollerto expect her comming, in an extreame frost and snow. In revengewhereof, by his imagined Art and skill, he made her to stand nakedon the top of a Tower, the space of a whole day, and in the hot monethof July, to be Sunburnt and bitten with Waspes and Flies.

应用

1.  WHEREBY ALL MEN MAY PLAINELY UNDERSTAND, THAT LOYALTY
2.  The Woman having her eyes fixed on the ground, knew not well howshee should denie him; and yet in plaine words, to say shee consented,shee held it to be overbase and immodest, and ill agreeing with herformer reputation: when the Abbot had well noted this attention inher, and how silent shee stood without returning any answere; heaccounted the conquest to be more then halfe his owne: so thatcontinuing on his former perswasions, hee never ceased, but alluredher still to beleeve whatsoever he saide. And much ashamed of hisimportunity, but more of her owne flexible yeelding weaknesse, madeanswere, that shee would willingly accomplish his request; which yetshee did not absolutely grant, untill Ferando were first sent intoPurgatory. And till then (quoth the Abbot) I will not urge any more,because I purpose his speedy sending thither: but yet, so farre lendme your assistance, that either to morrow, or else the next day, hemay come hither once more to converse with me. So putting a faire goldRing on her finger, they parted till the next meeting.
3.  Lesca, comforted her Lady, so much as lay in her power to doe, andhaving sought for Pyrrhus, whom she found at good leysure; and, in apleasing humor, thus she beganne. Pyrrhus, some few dayes since Itolde thee, in what extreame Agonies thy Lady and mine was, onely inregarde of her love to thee: and now againe I come once more, togive thee further assurance thereof: Wherefore, beleeve itunfeignedly, that if thy obstinacie continue still, in like manneras the other day it did, expect very shortly to heare the tydings ofher death.
4、  to dispossesse my minde,
5、  WHEREIN IS SIGNIFIED, THE PROVIDENCE OF A WISE MAN, WHEN

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网友评论(TLXe6TVv24189))

  • 江俊 08-11

      I did possesse in every part;

  • 张立东 08-11

      MAKE NO PROMISE OF YEELDING TO ANY, UNDER A COMPACT OR

  • 董明 08-11

       Worthy Gentlemen, this Lady is that true and faithfull servant,wherof I moved the question to you, whom I tooke out of the coldstreet, where her parents, kindred and friends (making no account atall of her) threw her forth, as a thing vile and unprofitable.Neverthelesse, such hath been my care and cost, that I have rescuedher out of deaths griping power; and, in a meere charitabledisposition, which honest affection caused me to beare her; of a body,full of terror and affrighting (as then she was) I have caused herto become thus lovely as you see. But because you may moreapparantly discerne, in what manner this occasion happened; I will layit open to you in more familiar manner. Then he began the wholehistory, from the originall of his unbeseeming affection to her (inregard she was a worthy mans wife) and consequently, how all hadhappened to the instant houre, to the no meane admiration of all thehearers, adding withall. Now Gentlemen (quoth he) if you varry notfrom your former opinion, and especially Signior NicoluccioCaccianimico: this Lady (by good right) is mine, and no man els by anyjust title, can lay any claime to her.

  • 曲探宙 08-11

      When I did follow Dyans traine,

  • 王卫国 08-10

    {  This Master Chappelet, was of so good and commendable life; that,being a Notarie, he held it in high disdaine, that any of hisContractes (although he made but few) should be found withoutfalshoode. And looke how many soever hee dealt withall, he would beurged and required thereto, offering them his paines and travailefor nothing, but to bee requited otherwise then by money; whichprooved to bee his much larger recompencing, and returned to him thefarre greater benefit. Hee tooke the onely pleasure of the world, tobeare false witnesse, if hee were thereto entreated, and(oftentimes) when hee was not requested at all. Likewise because inthose times, great trust and beleefe was given to an oath, he makingno care or conscience to be perjured: greatly advantaged himselfe byLaw suites, in regard that many matters relyed upon his oath, anddelivering the truth according to his knowledge.

  • 苏美英 08-09

      Are in my power,}

  • 俞越 08-09

      ANGRY MAN

  • 布里森 08-09

      The Scholler, whose envious spleene was swolne very great, inremembring such a malicious cruelty exercised on him, beholding toweepe and make such lamentations; found a fierce conflict in histhoughts, betweene content and pitty. It did not a little joy andcontent him, that the revenge which he so earnestly desired tocompasse, was now by him so effectually inflicted. And yet (in meerehumanity) pitty provoked him, to commisserate the Ladies distressedcondition: but clemency being over-weake to withstand his rigor,thus he replied. Madam Helena, if mine entreaties (which, to speaketruly, I never knew how to steepe in tears, nor wrap up my words insugar Candie, so cuningly as you women know how to do) could haveprevailed, that miserable night, when I was well-neere frozen to deathwith cold, and meerly buried with snow in your Court, not havinganie place of rescue or shelter; your complaints would now the moreeasily over-rule me. But if your honor in estimation, bee now moreprecious to you then heretofore, and it seemeth so offensive tostand there naked: convert your perswasions and prayers to him, inwhose armes you were that night imbraced, both of your triumphing inmy misery, when poor I, trotted about your Court, with the teethquivering in my head, and beating mine armes about my body, finding nocompassion in him, or you. Let him bring thee thy Garments, let himcome helpe thee down with the Ladder, and let him have the care ofthine honour, on whom thou hast bene so prodigall heretofore inbestowing it, and now hast unwomanly throwne thy selfe in perill,onely for the maintenance of thine immodest desires.

  • 姚锡棠 08-08

       Now there remained none but the King himselfe, last of all torecount his Novell; who, after hee heard the Ladies complaintsindifferently pacified, for the rash felling downe of such aprecious Peare-tree; thus he began. Faire Ladies, it is a case morethen manifest, that every King, who will be accounted just andupright: should first of all, and rather then any other, observe thoseLawes which he himselfe hath made; otherwise he ought to be reputed asa servant, worthy of punishment, and no King. Into which fault andreprehension, I your King, shall well neere be constrained to fall;for yesterday I enacted a Law, upon the forme of our discoursing, withfull intent, that this day I would not use any part of mypriviledge; but being subject (as you all are) to the same Law, Ishould speake of that argument, which already you have done.

  • 林金泰 08-06

    {  Well may I curse that sad and dismall day,

  • 塞特 08-06

      A beautifull young Virgine, named Andreana, became enamoured of ayoung Gentleman called Gabriello. In conference together, she declareda dreame of hers to him, and he another of his to her; whereuponGabriello fell downe sodainly dead in her armes. She, and herChamber-maide were apprehended, by the Officers belonging to theSeigneury, as they were carrying Gabriello, to lay him before his ownedoore. The Potestate offering violence to the Virgin, and sheresisting him vertuously: it came to the understanding of herFather, who approved the innocence of his daughter, and compassedher deliverance. But she afterward, being weary of all worldlyfelicities, entred into Religion, and became a Nun.

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