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2020-08-03 14:22:57  Դձ
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ѾѾ齫ƻ棨

ѾѾ齫ƻַ:a g 9 559 v i p<"Alas," he exclaimed, "among what manner of people am I fallen?Are they savage and uncivilized or hospitable and humane? Whereshall I put all this treasure, and which way shall I go? I wish Ihad stayed over there with the Phaeacians; or I could have gone tosome other great chief who would have been good to me and given mean escort. As it is I do not know where to put my treasure, and Icannot leave it here for fear somebody else should get hold of it.In good truth the chiefs and rulers of the Phaeacians have not beendealing fairly by me, and have left me in the wrong country; they saidthey would take me back to Ithaca and they have not done so: mayJove the protector of suppliants chastise them, for he watches overeverybody and punishes those who do wrong. Still, I suppose I mustcount my goods and see if the crew have gone off with any of them.""My mother," answered Telemachus, tells me I am son to Ulysses,but it is a wise child that knows his own father. Would that I wereson to one who had grown old upon his own estates, for, since youask me, there is no more ill-starred man under heaven than he who theytell me is my father."

Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."

ѾѾ齫ƻ棨廭

Then he went downstairs again, leaving Penelope in an agony ofgrief. There were plenty of seats in the house, but she. had noheart for sitting on any one of them; she could only fling herselfon the floor of her own room and cry; whereon all the maids in thehouse, both old and young, gathered round her and began to cry too,till at last in a transport of sorrow she exclaimed,

"My friend," said Nestor, "now that you remind me, I remember tohave heard that your mother has many suitors, who are ill disposedtowards you and are making havoc of your estate. Do you submit to thistamely, or are public feeling and the voice of heaven against you? Whoknows but what Ulysses may come back after all, and pay thesescoundrels in full, either single-handed or with a force of Achaeansbehind him? If Minerva were to take as great a liking to you as shedid to Ulysses when we were fighting before Troy (for I never yetsaw the gods so openly fond of any one as Minerva then was of yourfather), if she would take as good care of you as she did of him,these wooers would soon some of them him, forget their wooing."

On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:

ѾѾ齫ƻ棨 ɻ

"I will tell you the truth, my son," answered Euryclea. "There arefifty women in the house whom we teach to do things, such as cardingwool, and all kinds of household work. Of these, twelve in all havemisbehaved, and have been wanting in respect to me, and also toPenelope. They showed no disrespect to Telemachus, for he has onlylately grown and his mother never permitted him to give orders tothe female servants; but let me go upstairs and tell your wife allthat has happened, for some god has been sending her to sleep."

Calypso trembled with rage when she heard this, "You gods," sheexclaimed, to be ashamed of yourselves. You are always jealous andhate seeing a goddess take a fancy to a mortal man, and live withhim in open matrimony. So when rosy-fingered Dawn made love toOrion, you precious gods were all of you furious till Diana went andkilled him in Ortygia. So again when Ceres fell in love with Iasion,and yielded to him in a thrice ploughed fallow field, Jove came tohear of it before so long and killed Iasion with his thunder-bolts.And now you are angry with me too because I have a man here. I foundthe poor creature sitting all alone astride of a keel, for Jove hadstruck his ship with lightning and sunk it in mid ocean, so that allhis crew were drowned, while he himself was driven by wind and waveson to my island. I got fond of him and cherished him, and had set myheart on making him immortal, so that he should never grow old all hisdays; still I cannot cross Jove, nor bring his counsels to nothing;therefore, if he insists upon it, let the man go beyond the seasagain; but I cannot send him anywhere myself for I have neitherships nor men who can take him. Nevertheless I will readily give himsuch advice, in all good faith, as will be likely to bring himsafely to his own country."

ѾѾ齫ƻ棨йҶ ۻ

"The sons of Atreus called a meeting which was not as it shouldbe, for it was sunset and the Achaeans were heavy with wine. When theyexplained why they had called- the people together, it seemed thatMenelaus was for sailing homeward at once, and this displeasedAgamemnon, who thought that we should wait till we had offeredhecatombs to appease the anger of Minerva. Fool that he was, hemight have known that he would not prevail with her, for when the godshave made up their minds they do not change them lightly. So the twostood bandying hard words, whereon the Achaeans sprang to their feetwith a cry that rent the air, and were of two minds as to what theyshould do.

"I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him,and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, whenI saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him asplausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell ityou; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name isNoman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have alwayscalled me.'

So Ulysses slept in a bed placed in a room over the echoing gateway;but Alcinous lay in the inner part of the house, with the queen hiswife by his side.

ѾѾ齫ƻ棨ͻ

As he thus prayed, Minerva came close up to him in the likenessand with the voice of Mentor. "Telemachus," said she, "if you are madeof the same stuff as your father you will be neither fool nor cowardhenceforward, for Ulysses never broke his word nor left his workhalf done. If, then, you take after him, your voyage will not befruitless, but unless you have the blood of Ulysses and of Penelope inyour veins I see no likelihood of your succeeding. Sons are seldomas good men as their fathers; they are generally worse, not better;still, as you are not going to be either fool or cowardhenceforward, and are not entirely without some share of your father'swise discernment, I look with hope upon your undertaking. But mind younever make common cause with any of those foolish suitors, for theyhave neither sense nor virtue, and give no thought to death and to thedoom that will shortly fall on one and all of them, so that they shallperish on the same day. As for your voyage, it shall not be longdelayed; your father was such an old friend of mine that I will findyou a ship, and will come with you myself. Now, however, returnhome, and go about among the suitors; begin getting provisions readyfor your voyage; see everything well stowed, the wine in jars, and thebarley meal, which is the staff of life, in leathern bags, while Igo round the town and beat up volunteers at once. There are many shipsin Ithaca both old and new; I will run my eye over them for you andwill choose the best; we will get her ready and will put out to seawithout delay."

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ѾѾ齫ƻ׷ҰɡĿ鷢 "Then, when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Isent some men to Circe's house to fetch the body of Elpenor. We cutfirewood from a wood where the headland jutted out into the sea, andafter we had wept over him and lamented him we performed his funeralrites. When his body and armour had been burned to ashes, we raiseda cairn, set a stone over it, and at the top of the cairn we fixed theoar that he had been used to row with. ϸ

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ѾѾ齫ƻ׶̨ͨ"ͯĸŰ":ЭԮ ĸ̾ "Thus did they speak, but I answered sorrowfully, 'My men haveundone me; they, and cruel sleep, have ruined me. My friends, mendme this mischief, for you can if you will.' ϸ

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