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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杜涛涛 大小:tTIvqflf87908KB 下载:r8IyTJfT75336次
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日期:2020-08-06 21:55:47
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里克林克

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The others applauded what Antinous had said, and each one sent hisservant to bring his present. Antinous's man returned with a large andlovely dress most exquisitely embroidered. It had twelve beautifullymade brooch pins of pure gold with which to fasten it. Eurymachusimmediately brought her a magnificent chain of gold and amber beadsthat gleamed like sunlight. Eurydamas's two men returned with someearrings fashioned into three brilliant pendants which glistenedmost beautifully; while king Pisander son of Polyctor gave her anecklace of the rarest workmanship, and every one else brought her abeautiful present of some kind.
2.  On this, as he passed, he gave Ulysses a kick on the hip out of purewantonness, but Ulysses stood firm, and did not budge from the path.For a moment he doubted whether or no to fly at Melanthius and killhim with his staff, or fling him to the ground and beat his brainsout; he resolved, however, to endure it and keep himself in check, butthe swineherd looked straight at Melanthius and rebuked him, liftingup his hands and praying to heaven as he did so.
3.  Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.
4.  "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."
5.  "'Keep still,' said he in a low voice, 'or the others will hearyou.' Then he raised his head on his elbow.
6.  Presently the sun set and darkness was over all the land. The vesselmade a quick pass sage to Pheae and thence on to Elis, where theEpeans rule. Telemachus then headed her for the flying islands,wondering within himself whether he should escape death or should betaken prisoner.

计划指导

1.  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."
2.  As she spoke, she told Eumaeus to set the bow and the pieces of ironbefore the suitors, and Eumaeus wept as he took them to do as shehad bidden him. Hard by, the stockman wept also when he saw hismaster's bow, but Antinous scolded them. "You country louts," said he,"silly simpletons; why should you add to the sorrows of yourmistress by crying in this way? She has enough to grieve her in theloss of her husband; sit still, therefore, and eat your dinners insilence, or go outside if you want to cry, and leave the bow behindyou. We suitors shall have to contend for it with might and main,for we shall find it no light matter to string such a bow as thisis. There is not a man of us all who is such another as Ulysses; for Ihave seen him and remember him, though I was then only a child."
3.  Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.
4.  "You say truly, my dear father," answered Telemachus, "and you shallsee, if you will, that I am in no mind to disgrace your family."
5.  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:
6.  "This was what she said, and we assented; whereon we could see herworking on her great web all day long, but at night she would unpickthe stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us in this way forthree years and we never found her out, but as time wore on and shewas now in her fourth year, one of her maids who knew what she wasdoing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work, soshe had to finish it whether she would or no. The suitors,therefore, make you this answer, that both you and the Achaeans mayunderstand-'Send your mother away, and bid her marry the man of herown and of her father's choice'; for I do not know what will happen ifshe goes on plaguing us much longer with the airs she gives herself onthe score of the accomplishments Minerva has taught her, and becauseshe is so clever. We never yet heard of such a woman; we know allabout Tyro, Alcmena, Mycene, and the famous women of old, but theywere nothing to your mother, any one of them. It was not fair of herto treat us in that way, and as long as she continues in the mind withwhich heaven has now endowed her, so long shall we go on eating upyour estate; and I do not see why she should change, for she getsall the honour and glory, and it is you who pay for it, not she.Understand, then, that we will not go back to our lands, neitherhere nor elsewhere, till she has made her choice and married someone or other of us."

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1.  "Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of themagician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens,but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed herin the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
2.  With these words she came down from her upper room, not alone butattended by two of her maidens, and when she reached the suitors shestood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a staid maid servant oneither side of her. As they beheld her the suitors were so overpoweredand became so desperately enamoured of her, that each one prayed hemight win her for his own bed fellow.
3.  "Then," said Penelope, "if you are a god or have been sent here bydivine commission, tell me also about that other unhappy one- is hestill alive, or is he already dead and in the house of Hades?"
4.  BOOK VII.
5.   "Here she ended, and dawn enthroned in gold began to show in heaven,whereon she returned inland. I then went on board and told my men toloose the ship from her moorings; so they at once got into her, tooktheir places, and began to smite the grey sea with their oars.Presently the great and cunning goddess Circe befriended us with afair wind that blew dead aft, and stayed steadily with us, keeping oursails well filled, so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear,and let her go as wind and helmsman headed her.
6.  BOOK VI.

应用

1.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."
2.  With these words he led the way and the others followed after.When they had brought the things as he told them, Telemachus went onboard, Minerva going before him and taking her seat in the stern ofthe vessel, while Telemachus sat beside her. Then the men loosed thehawsers and took their places on the benches. Minerva sent them a fairwind from the West, that whistled over the deep blue waves whereonTelemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes and hoist sail, andthey did as he told them. They set the mast in its socket in the crossplank, raised it, and made it fast with the forestays; then theyhoisted their white sails aloft with ropes of twisted ox hide. Asthe sail bellied out with the wind, the ship flew through the deepblue water, and the foam hissed against her bows as she sped onward.Then they made all fast throughout the ship, filled the mixing-bowlsto the brim, and made drink offerings to the immortal gods that arefrom everlasting, but more particularly to the grey-eyed daughter ofJove.
3.  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:
4、  This was what he said, but all the time he was expecting to beable to string the bow and shoot through the iron, whereas in facthe was to be the first that should taste of the arrows from thehands of Ulysses, whom he was dishonouring in his own house- eggingthe others on to do so also.
5、  Meanwhile Agelaus son of Damastor, Eurynomus, Amphimedon,Demoptolemus, Pisander, and Polybus son of Polyctor bore the bruntof the fight upon the suitors' side; of all those who were stillfighting for their lives they were by far the most valiant, for theothers had already fallen under the arrows of Ulysses. Agelaus shoutedto them and said, "My friends, he will soon have to leave off, forMentor has gone away after having done nothing for him but brag.They are standing at the doors unsupported. Do not aim at him all atonce, but six of you throw your spears first, and see if you cannotcover yourselves with glory by killing him. When he has fallen we neednot be uneasy about the others."

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  • 刘新齐 08-05

      "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'

  • 张静雯 08-05

      And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

  • 张寿永 08-05

       "And I saw Sisyphus at his endless task raising his prodigious stonewith both his hands. With hands and feet he' tried to roll it up tothe top of the hill, but always, just before he could roll it overon to the other side, its weight would be too much for him, and thepitiless stone would come thundering down again on to the plain.Then he would begin trying to push it up hill again, and the sweat ranoff him and the steam rose after him.

  • 蒋中福 08-05

      "My dear," answered Ulysses, "why should you press me to tell you?Still, I will not conceal it from you, though you will not like BOOKit. I do not like it myself, for Teiresias bade me travel far andwide, carrying an oar, till I came to a country where the peoplehave never heard of the sea, and do not even mix salt with their food.They know nothing about ships, nor oars that are as the wings of aship. He gave me this certain token which I will not hide from you. Hesaid that a wayfarer should meet me and ask me whether it was awinnowing shovel that I had on my shoulder. On this, I was to fix myoar in the ground and sacrifice a ram, a bull, and a boar toNeptune; after which I was to go home and offer hecatombs to all thegods in heaven, one after the other. As for myself, he said that deathshould come to me from the sea, and that my life should ebb awayvery gently when I was full of years and peace of mind, and mypeople should bless me. All this, he said, should surely come topass."

  • 张晓嵘 08-04

    {  On these words the old woman covered her face with her hands; shebegan to weep and made lamentation saying, "My dear child, I cannotthink whatever I am to do with you. I am certain no one was evermore god-fearing than yourself, and yet Jove hates you. No one inthe whole world ever burned him more thigh bones, nor gave him finerhecatombs when you prayed you might come to a green old age yourselfand see your son grow up to take after you; yet see how he hasprevented you alone from ever getting back to your own home. I have nodoubt the women in some foreign palace which Ulysses has got to aregibing at him as all these sluts here have been gibing you. I do notwonder at your not choosing to let them wash you after the manner inwhich they have insulted you; I will wash your feet myself gladlyenough, as Penelope has said that I am to do so; I will wash them bothfor Penelope's sake and for your own, for you have raised the mostlively feelings of compassion in my mind; and let me say thismoreover, which pray attend to; we have had all kinds of strangersin distress come here before now, but I make bold to say that no oneever yet came who was so like Ulysses in figure, voice, and feet asyou are."

  • 惠晓翠 08-03

      Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."}

  • 吴燕峰 08-03

      "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.

  • 蒋诗伟 08-03

      BOOK III.

  • 马克·沃尔夫 08-02

       THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.

  • 蔡代征 07-31

    {  "'And I will tell you of all the wicked witchcraft that Circe willtry to practise upon you. She will mix a mess for you to drink, andshe will drug the meal with which she makes it, but she will not beable to charm you, for the virtue of the herb that I shall give youwill prevent her spells from working. I will tell you all about it.When Circe strikes you with her wand, draw your sword and springupon her as though you were goings to kill her. She will then befrightened and will desire you to go to bed with her; on this you mustnot point blank refuse her, for you want her to set your companionsfree, and to take good care also of yourself, but you make her swearsolemnly by all the blessed that she will plot no further mischiefagainst you, or else when she has got you naked she will unman you andmake you fit for nothing.'

  • 胡毅杰 07-31

      Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."

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