վҳʱ ƾ̨ ۵ Ļ Ƶ֪ʶȨ

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2020-08-11 03:24:36  Դձ
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Worthy Ladies, I am sure it is not unknowne to you, that it is,and hath bene a generall passion, to all men and women living, tosee divers and sundry things while they are sleeping. And although (tothe sleeper) they seeme most certaine, so that when he awaketh, hejudgeth the trueth of some, the likelyhood of others, and somebeyond all possibility of truth: yet notwithstanding, many dreameshave bene observed to happen; and very strangely have come to passe.And this hath bene a grounded reason for some men, to give as greatcredit to such things as they see sleeping, as they do to othersusually waking. So that, according unto their dreames, and as theymake construction of them, that are sadly distasted, or merrilypleased, even as (by them) they either feare or hope. On the contrary,there are some, who will not credit any dreame whatsoever, untill theybe falne into the very same danger which formerly they saw, and mostevidently in their sleepe.

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The harsh and uncivill usage in her, grew very distastefull toAnastasio, and so unsufferable, that after a long time of fruitlesseservice, requited still with nothing but coy disdaine; desperateresolutions entred into his brain, and often he was minded to killhimselfe. But better thoughts supplanting those furious passions, heabstained from any such violent act; and governed by more manlyconsideration, determined, that as shee hated him, he would requiteher with the like, if he could: wherein he became altogether deceived,because as his hopes grew to a dayly decaying, yet his love enlargedit selfe more and more.

Lovely and gracious, no Element at jarre,

WHEREBY MAY BEE OBSERVED, THAT SUCH AS WILL SPEAKE CONTEMPTIBLY OF

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BEHALFE OF LOVE-SICKE LISANA

In regard of this terrifying dreame, when Talano was risen in themorning, and sate conversing with his wife, he spake thus unto hir.Woman, although thy froward wilfull Nature be such, as hath notpermitted me one pleasing day with thee, since first we becam manand wife, but rather my life hath bene most tedious to me, asfearing still some mischeefe should happen to thee: yet let mee now inloving manner advise thee, to follow my counsell, and (this day) notto walke abroad out of this house. She demanded a reason for thisadvice of his. He related to her every particular of his dreame,adding with all these speeches.

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Signior Rogiero continuing there, living in honorable maner, andperforming many admirable actions of arms; in short time he madehimselfe sufficiently knowne, for a very valiant and famous man. Andhaving remained an indifferent long while, observing divers behavioursin the king: he saw, how enclined himselfe first to one man, thenanother, bestowing on one a Castle, a Towne on another, andBaronnies on divers, som-what indiscreetly, as giving away bountifulto men of no merit. And restraining all his favors from him, asseeming close fisted, and parting with nothing: he took it as adiminishing of his former reputation, and a great empayring of hisfame, wherefore he resolved on his departure thence, and made his suitto the king that he might obtaine it. The king did grant it, bestowingon him one of the very best Mules, and the goodliest that ever wasbackt, a gift most highly pleasing to Rogiero, in regarde of thelong journy he intended to ride. Which being delivcrd, the king gavecharge to one of his Gentlemen, to compasse such convenient meanes, asto ride thorow the country, and in the company of Signior Rogiero, yetin such manner, as he should not perceive, that the King had purposelysent him so to do. Respectively he should observe whatsoever he saidconcerning the king, his gesture, smiles, and other behavior,shaping his answers accordingly, and on the nexte morning to commandhis returne backe with him to the King.

By winkes, words, smiles, in crafty kinde,

So parting; about the houre of dinner time, Guiotto went to thehouse of the saide Messer Corso, whom he found sitting and talkingwith certain of his neighbors, but dinner was not (as yet) ready,neither were they come thither to dinner. Messer Corso demaunded ofGuiotto, what newes with him, and whither he went? Why Sir (saidGuiotto) I come to dine with you, and your good company. Wherto MesserCorso answered, That he was welcom, and his other friends beinggone, dinner was served in, none els therat present but Messer Corsoand Guiotto: al the diet being a poore dish of Pease, a litle piece ofTunny, and a few smal fishes fried, without any other dishes to followafter. Guiotto seeing no better fare, but being disapointed of hisexpectation, as longing to feed on the Lampries and Sturgeon, and soto have made a ful dinner indeed: was of a quick apprehension, andapparantly perceived, that Blondello had meerly guld him in a knavery,which did not a litle vex him, and made him vow to be revenged onBlondello, as he could compasse occasion afterward.

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A young Gentleman being a Scholler, fell in love with a Ladie, namedHelena, she being a Widdow, and addicted in affection to anotherGentleman. One whole night in cold Winter, she caused the Schollerto expect her comming, in an extreame frost and snow. In revengewhereof, by his imagined Art and skill, he made her to stand nakedon the top of a Tower, the space of a whole day, and in the hot monethof July, to be Sunburnt and bitten with Waspes and Flies.

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Ͱ쳶гγɹ񲿺˼ֱƷ4 When of them had delivered their Novels, Dioneus knowing, that itremained in him to relate the last for this day: without attending forany solemne command (after he had imposed silence on them, thatcould not sufficiently commend the witty reprehension of Guido),thus he began. Wise and worthy Ladies, although by the priviledgeyou have granted, it is lawfull for me to speake any thing bestpleasing to my self: yet notwithstanding, it is not any part of mymeaning, to varrie from the matter and method, whereof you have spokento very good purpose. And therefore, following your footsteppes, Ientend to tell you, how craftily, and with a Rampiar sodainly raisedin his owne defence: a Religious Frier of Saint Anthonies Order,shunned a shame, which two O wily companions had prepared for him. Norlet it offend you, if I run into more large discourse, then this dayhath bene used by any, for the apter compleating of my Novell:because, if you well observe it, the Sun is as yet in the middest ofheaven, and therefore you may the better forbeare me. ϸ

߱ĸӷͬ:ȥϷŮԱͼ| ̵2018|ͺ6LMPV춯µ22.98

Ͱ5ɶͯӣ Heere wanted but a Priest to joyne their hands, as mutuall affectionalready had done their hearts, which being sealed with infinit kisses,the Chamber-maide called up Friar Roger her Confessor, and wedding andbedding were both effected before the bright morning. In breefe, theMarquesse having heard of the marriage, did not mislike it, butconfirmed it by great and honourable giftes; and having sent for hisdishonest Servant, he dispatched him (after sound reprehension) toFerrara, with Letters to Rinaldoes Father and Friends, of all theaccidents that had befalne him. Moreover, the very same morning, thethree Theeves that had robbed, and so ill intreated Rinaldo, foranother facte by them the same night committed, were taken, andbrought to the Towne of Chasteau Guillaume, where they were hanged fortheir offences, and Rinaldo with his wife rode to Ferrara. ϸ

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