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2020-08-04 20:40:36  Դձ
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Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."

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"I will tell you all about them," replied Eumaeus, "Laertes is stillliving and prays heaven to let him depart peacefully his own house,for he is terribly distressed about the absence of his son, and alsoabout the death of his wife, which grieved him greatly and aged himmore than anything else did. She came to an unhappy end through sorrowfor her son: may no friend or neighbour who has dealt kindly by mecome to such an end as she did. As long as she was still living,though she was always grieving, I used to like seeing her and askingher how she did, for she brought me up along with her daughterCtimene, the youngest of her children; we were boy and girltogether, and she made little difference between us. When, however, weboth grew up, they sent Ctimene to Same and received a splendiddowry for her. As for me, my mistress gave me a good shirt and cloakwith a pair of sandals for my feet, and sent me off into thecountry, but she was just as fond of me as ever. This is all over now.Still it has pleased heaven to prosper my work in the situationwhich I now hold. I have enough to eat and drink, and can findsomething for any respectable stranger who comes here; but there is nogetting a kind word or deed out of my mistress, for the house hasfallen into the hands of wicked people. Servants want sometimes to seetheir mistress and have a talk with her; they like to have somethingto eat and drink at the house, and something too to take back withthem into the country. This is what will keep servants in a goodhumour."

On this the goatherd Melanthius went by back passages to the storeroom of Ulysses, house. There he chose twelve shields, with as manyhelmets and spears, and brought them back as fast as he could togive them to the suitors. Ulysses' heart began to fail him when he sawthe suitors putting on their armour and brandishing their spears. Hesaw the greatness of the danger, and said to Telemachus, "Some oneof the women inside is helping the suitors against us, or it may beMelanthius."

Now Neptune had gone off to the Ethiopians, who are at the world'send, and lie in two halves, the one looking West and the other East.He had gone there to accept a hecatomb of sheep and oxen, and wasenjoying himself at his festival; but the other gods met in thehouse of Olympian Jove, and the sire of gods and men spoke first. Atthat moment he was thinking of Aegisthus, who had been killed byAgamemnon's son Orestes; so he said to the other gods:

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Then Eumaeus said, "You have perceived aright, as indeed yougenerally do; but let us think what will be our best course. Willyou go inside first and join the suitors, leaving me here behindyou, or will you wait here and let me go in first? But do not waitlong, or some one may you loitering about outside, and throw somethingat you. Consider this matter I pray you."<"Telemachus," said she, "the men are on board and at their oars,waiting for you to give your orders, so make haste and let us be off."

The others all agreed, but Ulysses, to throw them off the scent,said, "Sirs, an old man like myself, worn out with suffering, cannothold his own against a young one; but my irrepressible belly urgesme on, though I know it can only end in my getting a drubbing. Youmust swear, however that none of you will give me a foul blow tofavour Irus and secure him the victory."

uƽַ̨ܴйҶ ۻ

"You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vainhopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could ofhimself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself oldand young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him. A secondago you were old and all in rags, and now you are like some god comedown from heaven."

"Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."

<"Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,

"What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."

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<"I was dismayed when I heard this. I sat up in bed and wept, andwould gladly have lived no longer to see the light of the sun, butpresently when I was tired of weeping and tossing myself about, Isaid, 'And who shall guide me upon this voyage- for the house of Hadesis a port that no ship can reach.'With this he got up and made a bed for Ulysses by throwing somegoatskins and sheepskins on the ground in front of the fire. HereUlysses lay down, and Eumaeus covered him over with a great heavycloak that he kept for a change in case of extraordinarily badweather.

Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."

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uƽַ̨ܴԬ۾ôϺڽ ⽻Ӧ When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Ulysses puton his shirt and cloak, while the goddess wore a dress of a lightgossamer fabric, very fine and graceful, with a beautiful goldengirdle about her waist and a veil to cover her head. She at once setherself to think how she could speed Ulysses on his way. So she gavehim a great bronze axe that suited his hands; it was sharpened on bothsides, and had a beautiful olive-wood handle fitted firmly on to it.She also gave him a sharp adze, and then led the way to the far end ofthe island where the largest trees grew- alder, poplar and pine,that reached the sky- very dry and well seasoned, so as to saillight for him in the water. Then, when she had shown him where thebest trees grew, Calypso went home, leaving him to cut them, whichhe soon finished doing. He cut down twenty trees in all and adzed themsmooth, squaring them by rule in good workmanlike fashion. MeanwhileCalypso came back with some augers, so he bored holes with them andfitted the timbers together with bolts and rivets. He made the raft asbroad as a skilled shipwright makes the beam of a large vessel, and hefiled a deck on top of the ribs, and ran a gunwale all round it. Healso made a mast with a yard arm, and a rudder to steer with. Hefenced the raft all round with wicker hurdles as a protectionagainst the waves, and then he threw on a quantity of wood. By andby Calypso brought him some linen to make the sails, and he made thesetoo, excellently, making them fast with braces and sheets. Last ofall, with the help of levers, he drew the raft down into the water. ϸ

껡桷5ɨӰοʹʧӰ| ̵2018|ճԱԼdz񶾡

uƽַ̨ܴ֮С߿ҵָ0.51% ǰ Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them. ϸ

uƽַ̨ܴȽӨӱɹػعǰ Ѽؾ| ̵2018|̲רԭֳԺ˳ܻ߳ǧ
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