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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:谢细忠 大小:dInhxHQV40755KB 下载:59XzhR5l21916次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:9D1BSSY593860条
日期:2020-08-09 08:30:43
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李丹丹

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "The men were broken-hearted as they heard me, and threwthemselves on the ground groaning and tearing their hair, but they didnot mend matters by crying. When we reached the sea shore, weeping andlamenting our fate, Circe brought the ram and the ewe, and we madethem fast hard by the ship. She passed through the midst of us withoutour knowing it, for who can see the comings and goings of a god, ifthe god does not wish to be seen?
2.  On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.
3.  At this moment the bow was in the hands of Eurymachus, who waswarming it by the fire, but even so he could not string it, and he wasgreatly grieved. He heaved a deep sigh and said, "I grieve formyself and for us all; I grieve that I shall have to forgo themarriage, but I do not care nearly so much about this, for there areplenty of other women in Ithaca and elsewhere; what I feel most is thefact of our being so inferior to Ulysses in strength that we cannotstring his bow. This will disgrace us in the eyes of those who are yetunborn."
4.  And in like manner Eumaeus prayed that Ulysses might return home.
5.  They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'
6.  Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."

计划指导

1.  But Telemachus said, "Hush, do not answer him; Antinous has thebitterest tongue of all the suitors, and he makes the others worse."
2.  He left the house as he spoke, and went back to Piraeus who gave himwelcome, but the suitors kept looking at one another and provokingTelemachus fly laughing at the strangers. One insolent fellow saidto him, "Telemachus, you are not happy in your guests; first youhave this importunate tramp, who comes begging bread and wine andhas no skill for work or for hard fighting, but is perfectlyuseless, and now here is another fellow who is setting himself up as aprophet. Let me persuade you, for it will be much better, to putthem on board ship and send them off to the Sicels to sell for whatthey will bring."
3.  As he spoke he kissed his son, and a tear fell from his cheek onto the ground, for he had restrained all tears till now. butTelemachus could not yet believe that it was his father, and said:
4.  "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'
5.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."
6.  "When I had told him this, the ghost of Achilles strode off across ameadow full of asphodel, exulting over what I had said concerningthe prowess of his son.

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1.  Then he said to Melanthius the goatherd, "Look sharp, light a firein the court, and set a seat hard by with a sheep skin on it; bring usalso a large ball of lard, from what they have in the house. Let uswarm the bow and grease it we will then make trial of it again, andbring the contest to an end."
2.  Then Amphinomus drew his sword and made straight at Ulysses to tryand get him away from the door; but Telemachus was too quick forhim, and struck him from behind; the spear caught him between theshoulders and went right through his chest, so that he fell heavily tothe ground and struck the earth with his forehead. Then Telemachussprang away from him, leaving his spear still in the body, for hefeared that if he stayed to draw it out, some one of the Achaeansmight come up and hack at him with his sword, or knock him down, so heset off at a run, and immediately was at his father's side. Then hesaid:
3.  "'My friends,' said I, 'this is not the first time that we have beenin danger, and we are in nothing like so bad a case as when theCyclops shut us up in his cave; nevertheless, my courage and wisecounsel saved us then, and we shall live to look back on all this aswell. Now, therefore, let us all do as I say, trust in Jove and row onwith might and main. As for you, coxswain, these are your orders;attend to them, for the ship is in your hands; turn her head away fromthese steaming rapids and hug the rock, or she will give you theslip and be over yonder before you know where you are, and you will bethe death of us.'
4.  When she had thus spoken, she flew away in the form of an eagle, andall marvelled as they beheld it. Nestor was astonished, and tookTelemachus by the hand. "My friend," said he, "I see that you aregoing to be a great hero some day, since the gods wait upon you thuswhile you are still so young. This can have been none other of thosewho dwell in heaven than Jove's redoubtable daughter, theTrito-born, who showed such favour towards your brave father among theArgives." "Holy queen," he continued, "vouchsafe to send down thygrace upon myself, my good wife, and my children. In return, I willoffer you in sacrifice a broad-browed heifer of a year old,unbroken, and never yet brought by man under the yoke. I will gild herhorns, and will offer her up to you in sacrifice."
5.   "But how, Mentor," replied Telemachus, "dare I go up to Nestor,and how am I to address him? I have never yet been used to holdinglong conversations with people, and am ashamed to begin questioningone who is so much older than myself."
6.  Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.

应用

1.  "Go to the house, and kill the best pig that you can find fordinner. Meanwhile I want to see whether my father will know me, orfail to recognize me after so long an absence."
2.  Then Penelope answered, "Stranger, heaven robbed me of all beauty,whether of face or figure, when the Argives set sail for Troy and mydear husband with them. If he were to return and look after my affairsI should be both more respected and should show a better presence tothe world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. The chiefs fromall our islands- Dulichium, Same, and Zacynthus, as also from Ithacaitself, are wooing me against my will and are wasting my estate. I cantherefore show no attention to strangers, nor suppliants, nor topeople who say that they are skilled artisans, but am all the timebrokenhearted about Ulysses. They want me to marry again at once,and I have to invent stratagems in order to deceive them. In the firstplace heaven put it in my mind to set up a great tambour-frame in myroom, and to begin working upon an enormous piece of fineneedlework. Then I said to them, 'Sweethearts, Ulysses is indeed dead,still, do not press me to marry again immediately; wait- for I wouldnot have my skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havefinished making a pall for the hero Laertes, to be ready against thetime when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the women ofthe place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.' This was what Isaid, and they assented; whereon I used to keep working at my greatweb all day long, but at night I would unpick the stitches again bytorch light. I fooled them in this way for three years without theirfinding it out, but as time wore on and I was now in my fourth year,in the waning of moons, and many days had been accomplished, thosegood-for-nothing hussies my maids betrayed me to the suitors, whobroke in upon me and caught me; they were very angry with me, so I wasforced to finish my work whether I would or no. And now I do not seehow I can find any further shift for getting out of this marriage.My parents are putting great pressure upon me, and my son chafes atthe ravages the suitors are making upon his estate, for he is nowold enough to understand all about it and is perfectly able to lookafter his own affairs, for heaven has blessed him with an excellentdisposition. Still, notwithstanding all this, tell me who you areand where you come from- for you must have had father and mother ofsome sort; you cannot be the son of an oak or of a rock."
3.  'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."
4、  "So she swore at once as I had told her, and when she hadcompleted her oath then I went to bed with her.
5、  "This is the house, father stranger, which you would have me showyou. You will find a number of great people sitting at table, but donot be afraid; go straight in, for the bolder a man is the more likelyhe is to carry his point, even though he is a stranger. First find thequeen. Her name is Arete, and she comes of the same family as herhusband Alcinous. They both descend originally from Neptune, who wasfather to Nausithous by Periboea, a woman of great beauty. Periboeawas the youngest daughter of Eurymedon, who at one time reigned overthe giants, but he ruined his ill-fated people and lost his own lifeto boot.

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  • 周道炯 08-08

      "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."

  • 彼得贝瑞 08-08

      To this Eurymachus son of Polybus answered, "Take heart, QueenPenelope daughter of Icarius, and do not trouble yourself aboutthese matters. The man is not yet born, nor never will be, who shalllay hands upon your son Telemachus, while I yet live to look uponthe face of the earth. I say- and it shall surely be- that my spearshall be reddened with his blood; for many a time has Ulysses taken meon his knees, held wine up to my lips to drink, and put pieces of meatinto my hands. Therefore Telemachus is much the dearest friend I have,and has nothing to fear from the hands of us suitors. Of course, ifdeath comes to him from the gods, he cannot escape it." He said thisto quiet her, but in reality he was plotting against Telemachus.

  • 裴聪悦 08-08

       "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'

  • 费玲玲 08-08

      Thus did they converse in the house of Hades deep down within thebowels of the earth. Meanwhile Ulysses and the others passed out ofthe town and soon reached the fair and well-tilled farm of Laertes,which he had reclaimed with infinite labour. Here was his house,with a lean-to running all round it, where the slaves who worked forhim slept and sat and ate, while inside the house there was an oldSicel woman, who looked after him in this his country-farm. WhenUlysses got there, he said to his son and to the other two:

  • 玛依塔斯 08-07

    {  This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."

  • 塔诺 08-06

      "Meanwhile Circe had been seeing that the men who had been leftbehind were washed and anointed with olive oil; she had also giventhem woollen cloaks and shirts, and when we came we found them allcomfortably at dinner in her house. As soon as the men saw eachother face to face and knew one another, they wept for joy and criedaloud till the whole palace rang again. Thereon Circe came up to meand said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, tell your men to leave offcrying; I know how much you have all of you suffered at sea, and howill you have fared among cruel savages on the mainland, but that isover now, so stay here, and eat and drink till you are once more asstrong and hearty as you were when you left Ithaca; for at present youare weakened both in body and mind; you keep all the time thinkingof the hardships- you have suffered during your travels, so that youhave no more cheerfulness left in you.'}

  • 李基洙 08-06

      "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'

  • 余堰 08-06

      "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."

  • 陆文平 08-05

       "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'

  • 德米特里·基谢廖夫 08-03

    {  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."

  • 李永忠 08-03

      "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."

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