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2020-08-12 23:38:31  Դձ
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k7ַ:a g 9 559 v i p<"I don't know whether I CAN>, answered Sara, still in her half-whisper; "but I will try.""It is monstrous!" she said. "She's in my sitting room at this moment, dressed in silk gauze and lace petticoats, giving a party at my expense."

When Sara entered the schoolroom the next morning everybody looked at her with wide, interested eyes. By that time every pupil-- from Lavinia Herbert, who was nearly thirteen and felt quite grown up, to Lottie Legh, who was only just four and the baby of the school-- had heard a great deal about her. They knew very certainly that she was Miss Minchin's show pupil and was considered a credit to the establishment. One or two of them had even caught a glimpse of her French maid, Mariette, who had arrived the evening before. Lavinia had managed to pass Sara's room when the door was open, and had seen Mariette opening a box which had arrived late from some shop.

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"But you say `IF> the child was the one I am in search of. You say 'if.' We are not sure. There was a difference in the name."

Miss Amelia sat down quite heavily in the nearest chair.

Miss Minchin was scandalized. She glanced from one figure to the other.

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Anyone who has not done this does not know what a different world they saw. The slates spread out on either side of them and slanted down into the rain gutter-pipes. The sparrows, being at home there, twittered and hopped about quite without fear. Two of them perched on the chimney top nearest and quarrelled with each other fiercely until one pecked the other and drove him away. The garret window next to theirs was shut because the house next door was empty.<"And the wretched woman actually did not know where they had taken her!" exclaimed Mr. Carrisford.

"Don't talk nonsense about people liking you," said Miss Minchin. "You will have to do more than teach the little ones. You will run errands and help in the kitchen as well as in the schoolroom. If you don't please me, you will be sent away. Remember that. Now go."

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"It is much better than if she kicked and screamed, as some of them do," Miss Minchin answered. "I expected that a child as much spoiled as she is would set the whole house in an uproar. If ever a child was given her own way in everything, she is."

But she could not--even though she kept her eyes closed tightly, she could not. Something was forcing her to awaken-- something in the room. It was a sense of light, and a sound-- the sound of a crackling, roaring little fire.

"No," answered Sara. "He's as polite as we are. He is just like a person. Now watch!"

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She took off her hat and coat and hung them on a nail against the wall, and she changed her wet shoes for an old pair of slippers. Then she jumped on the bed, and drawing the coverlet about her shoulders, sat with her arms round her knees. "Now, listen," she said.

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k7˶人ԭײԭжΪ͹״ Then Miss Amelia began to wring her fat hands and cry. ϸ

山һסլ¥,ѻԱ| ̵2018|@ְԱ мί֪ͨ Щǧ

k77Сʱ棺ʾٴοչ೤ö Several of the Montmorencys were evidently going to a children's party, and just as Sara was about to pass the door they were crossing the pavement to get into the carriage which was waiting for them. Veronica Eustacia and Rosalind Gladys, in white-lace frocks and lovely sashes, had just got in, and Guy Clarence, aged five, was following them. He was such a pretty fellow and had such rosy cheeks and blue eyes, and such a darling little round head covered with curls, that Sara forgot her basket and shabby cloak altogether--in fact, forgot everything but that she wanted to look at him for a moment. So she paused and looked. ϸ

k7ǿ籩ϯˮû·֡ĭۡ| ̵2018|̨ʧ¡ӥֱϻҵ
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