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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张言平 大小:WMYr5UAQ32441KB 下载:ZUTAUaGu81755次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:Q4Snmfss92603条
日期:2020-08-08 09:41:45
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."
2.  Then Penelope went upstairs again and mourned her husband tillMinerva shed sleep over her eyes. In the evening Eumaeus got back toUlysses and his son, who had just sacrificed a young pig of a year oldand were ready; helping one another to get supper ready; Minervatherefore came up to Ulysses, turned him into an old man with a strokeof her wand, and clad him in his old clothes again, for fear thatthe swineherd might recognize him and not keep the secret, but goand tell Penelope.
3.  With these words he girded the sword about his shoulders and towardssundown the presents began to make their appearance, as the servantsof the donors kept bringing them to the house of King Alcinous; herehis sons received them, and placed them under their mother's charge.Then Alcinous led the way to the house and bade his guests taketheir seats.
4.  "My dear," answered Penelope, "I have no wish to set myself up,nor to depreciate you; but I am not struck by your appearance, for Ivery well remember what kind of a man you were when you set sailfrom Ithaca. Nevertheless, Euryclea, take his bed outside the bedchamber that he himself built. Bring the bed outside this room, andput bedding upon it with fleeces, good coverlets, and blankets."
5.  "Good heavens, this voyage of Telemachus is a very serious matter;we had made sure that it would come to nothing, but the young fellowhas got away in spite of us, and with a picked crew too. He will begiving us trouble presently; may Jove take him before he is fullgrown. Find me a ship, therefore, with a crew of twenty men, and Iwill lie in wait for him in the straits between Ithaca and Samos; hewill then rue the day that he set out to try and get news of hisfather."
6.  On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."

计划指导

1.  The words were hardly out of his mouth before his son stood at thedoor. Eumaeus sprang to his feet, and the bowls in which he was mixingwine fell from his hands, as he made towards his master. He kissed hishead and both his beautiful eyes, and wept for joy. A father could notbe more delighted at the return of an only son, the child of his oldage, after ten years' absence in a foreign country and after havinggone through much hardship. He embraced him, kissed him all over asthough he had come back from the dead, and spoke fondly to him saying:
2.  They left their sports as he told them, and when they were withinthe house, they laid their cloaks on the benches and seats inside, andthen sacrificed some sheep, goats, pigs, and a heifer, all of them fatand well grown. Thus they made ready for their meal. In the meantimeUlysses and the swineherd were about starting for the town, and theswineherd said, "Stranger, I suppose you still want to go to townto-day, as my master said you were to do; for my own part I shouldhave liked you to stay here as a station hand, but I must do as mymaster tells me, or he will scold me later on, and a scolding fromone's master is a very serious thing. Let us then be off, for it isnow broad day; it will be night again directly and then you willfind it colder."
3.  "Poor wretch," said she, "are you gone clean out of your mind? Goand sleep in some smithy, or place of public gossips, instead ofchattering here. Are you not ashamed of opening your mouth before yourbetters- so many of them too? Has the wine been getting into yourhead, or do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lostyour wits because you beat the tramp Irus; take care that a better manthan he does not come and cudgel you about the head till he pack youbleeding out of the house."
4.  "O queen," he said, "I implore your aid- but tell me, are you agoddess or are you a mortal woman? If you are a goddess and dwell inheaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana,for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the otherhand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are yourfather and mother- thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters;how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scionas yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all willhe be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who takes youto his own home. I never yet saw any one so beautiful, neither man norwoman, and am lost in admiration as I behold you. I can only compareyou to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growingnear the altar of Apollo- for I was there, too, with much people afterme, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all mytroubles. Never yet did such a young plant shoot out of the groundas that was, and I admired and wondered at it exactly as I nowadmire and wonder at yourself. I dare not clasp your knees, but I amin great distress; yesterday made the twentieth day that I had beentossing about upon the sea. The winds and waves have taken me allthe way from the Ogygian island, and now fate has flung me upon thiscoast that I may endure still further suffering; for I do not thinkthat I have yet come to the end of it, but rather that heaven hasstill much evil in store for me.
5.  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter, and made a vision inthe likeness of Penelope's sister Iphthime daughter of Icarius who hadmarried Eumelus and lived in Pherae. She told the vision to go tothe house of Ulysses, and to make Penelope leave off crying, so itcame into her room by the hole through which the thong went forpulling the door to, and hovered over her head, saying,
6.  "I agreed to this, so I went back to the sea shore, and found themen at the ship weeping and wailing most piteously. When they saw methe silly blubbering fellows began frisking round me as calves breakout and gambol round their mothers, when they see them coming hometo be milked after they have been feeding all day, and the homesteadresounds with their lowing. They seemed as glad to see me as thoughthey had got back to their own rugged Ithaca, where they had been bornand bred. 'Sir,' said the affectionate creatures, 'we are as glad tosee you back as though we had got safe home to Ithaca; but tell us allabout the fate of our comrades.'

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1.  "Meanwhile Menelaus and I were on our way home from Troy, on goodterms with one another. When we got to Sunium, which is the point ofAthens, Apollo with his painless shafts killed Phrontis thesteersman of Menelaus' ship (and never man knew better how to handle avessel in rough weather) so that he died then and there with thehelm in his hand, and Menelaus, though very anxious to pressforward, had to wait in order to bury his comrade and give him his duefuneral rites. Presently, when he too could put to sea again, andhad sailed on as far as the Malean heads, Jove counselled evil againsthim and made it it blow hard till the waves ran mountains high. Herehe divided his fleet and took the one half towards Crete where theCydonians dwell round about the waters of the river Iardanus. There isa high headland hereabouts stretching out into the sea from a placecalled Gortyn, and all along this part of the coast as far as Phaestusthe sea runs high when there is a south wind blowing, but arterPhaestus the coast is more protected, for a small headland can makea great shelter. Here this part of the fleet was driven on to therocks and wrecked; but the crews just managed to save themselves. Asfor the other five ships, they were taken by winds and seas toEgypt, where Menelaus gathered much gold and substance among people ofan alien speech. Meanwhile Aegisthus here at home plotted his evildeed. For seven years after he had killed Agamemnon he ruled inMycene, and the people were obedient under him, but in the eighth yearOrestes came back from Athens to be his bane, and killed themurderer of his father. Then he celebrated the funeral rites of hismother and of false Aegisthus by a banquet to the people of Argos, andon that very day Menelaus came home, with as much treasure as hisships could carry.
2.  "You are asleep, Penelope: the gods who live at ease will not sufferyou to weep and be so sad. Your son has done them no wrong, so he willyet come back to you."
3.  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. I saw thatheaven meant us a mischief and said, 'You force me to yield, for youare many against one, but at any rate each one of you must take hissolemn oath that if he meet with a herd of cattle or a large flockof sheep, he will not be so mad as to kill a single head of either,but will be satisfied with the food that Circe has given us.'
4.  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:
5.   Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."
6.  A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewerand poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, andshe drew a clean table beside them. An upper servant brought thembread, and offered them many good things of what there was in thehouse, the carver fetched them plates of all manner of meats and setcups of gold by their side, and a man-servant brought them wine andpoured it out for them.

应用

1.  "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."
2.  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.
3.  "Queen Penelope," answered Eurymachus, "we do not suppose thatthis man will take you away with him; it is impossible; but we areafraid lest some of the baser sort, men or women among the Achaeans,should go gossiping about and say, 'These suitors are a feeble folk;they are paying court to the wife of a brave man whose bow not oneof them was able to string, and yet a beggarly tramp who came to thehouse strung it at once and sent an arrow through the iron.' This iswhat will be said, and it will be a scandal against us."
4、  All this he told, but Ulysses was overcome as he heard him, andhis cheeks were wet with tears. He wept as a woman weeps when shethrows herself on the body of her husband who has fallen before hisown city and people, fighting bravely in defence of his home andchildren. She screams aloud and flings her arms about him as he liesgasping for breath and dying, but her enemies beat her from behindabout the back and shoulders, and carry her off into slavery, to alife of labour and sorrow, and the beauty fades from her cheeks-even so piteously did Ulysses weep, but none of those presentperceived his tears except Alcinous, who was sitting near him, andcould hear the sobs and sighs that he was heaving. The king,therefore, at once rose and said:
5、  As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.

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  • 李金团 08-07

      "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."

  • 廖建江 08-07

      Thus did he speak, and the others applauded his saying; they thenall of them went inside the buildings.

  • 李飚 08-07

       And Eumaeus answered, "Antinous, your birth is good but your wordsevil. It was no doing of mine that he came here. Who is likely toinvite a stranger from a foreign country, unless it be one of thosewho can do public service as a seer, a healer of hurts, a carpenter,or a bard who can charm us with his Such men are welcome all the worldover, but no one is likely to ask a beggar who will only worry him.You are always harder on Ulysses' servants than any of the othersuitors are, and above all on me, but I do not care so long asTelemachus and Penelope are alive and here."

  • 丁世伟 08-07

      And Eumaeus answered, "Antinous, your birth is good but your wordsevil. It was no doing of mine that he came here. Who is likely toinvite a stranger from a foreign country, unless it be one of thosewho can do public service as a seer, a healer of hurts, a carpenter,or a bard who can charm us with his Such men are welcome all the worldover, but no one is likely to ask a beggar who will only worry him.You are always harder on Ulysses' servants than any of the othersuitors are, and above all on me, but I do not care so long asTelemachus and Penelope are alive and here."

  • 萧榕 08-06

    {  They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."

  • 李正忠 08-05

      "Aeolus entertained me for a whole month asking me questions all thetime about Troy, the Argive fleet, and the return of the Achaeans. Itold him exactly how everything had happened, and when I said I mustgo, and asked him to further me on my way, he made no sort ofdifficulty, but set about doing so at once. Moreover, he flayed me aprime ox-hide to hold the ways of the roaring winds, which he shutup in the hide as in a sack- for Jove had made him captain over thewinds, and he could stir or still each one of them according to hisown pleasure. He put the sack in the ship and bound the mouth sotightly with a silver thread that not even a breath of a side-windcould blow from any quarter. The West wind which was fair for us didhe alone let blow as it chose; but it all came to nothing, for we werelost through our own folly.}

  • 徐小勇 08-05

      "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'

  • 吴志华 08-05

      "Eumaeus, what a noble hound that is over yonder on the manure heap:his build is splendid; is he as fine a fellow as he looks, or is heonly one of those dogs that come begging about a table, and are keptmerely for show?"

  • 伊丽莎白玛莎 08-04

       Medon caught these words of Telemachus, for he was crouching under aseat beneath which he had hidden by covering himself up with a freshlyflayed heifer's hide, so he threw off the hide, went up to Telemachus,and laid hold of his knees.

  • 王铭晖 08-02

    {  ULYSSES was left in the cloister, pondering on the means wherebywith Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently hesaid to Telemachus, "Telemachus, we must get the armour together andtake it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why youhave removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way ofthe smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses wentaway, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this moreparticularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrelover their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which maydisgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimestempts people to use them."

  • 孔波斯特拉 08-02

      "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."

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